fuckyeahfluiddynamics

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The recently released music video for Jack White’s “High Ball Stepper” is a fantastic marriage of science and art. The audio is paired with visuals based around vibration effects using both granular materials and fluids. There are many examples of Faraday waves, the rippling patterns formed when a fluid interface becomes unstable under vibration. There are also cymatic patterns and even finger-like protrusions formed by when shear-thickening non-Newtonian fluids get agitated. (Video credit: J. White, B. Swank and J. Cathcart; submitted by Mike and Marius)

wetwareontologies

wetwareontologies:

Detailed in these two links [link] [link]is the theory underpinning one of the fundamental overlaps between biology and computationalism - the creation of DNA computers.

The pieces are lengthy but they illustrate how the computer science of finite state automata (not to be confused with cellular automata) are being ported into biology. Finite state machines (as they are also known) are simpler Turing machines, but still capable of executing computation. Like the Turing machine - they are concepts, or abstractions, of a notional computing device which exist independent of the material they are instantiated within.

Of most interest is the diagrams which abstract the ‘software’ portion of the system into elements which might be less readily understood as such, like transition molecules and mRNA.

Also of interest, the nomenclature for these entitites - they are variously referred to as ‘computational genes’ or ‘molecular automatons’

fromquarkstoquasars
fromquarkstoquasars:

The Best View in the Galaxy

The lovely rendering shown here is meant to be a computer simulation depicting the immediate environment of HD 69830 c; a planet that can be found about  41 light-years from Earth (in the Puppis constellation)

Our exoplanet is far more different than most of the planets we’ve discovered so far, being that the planet doesn’t want you dead before you can even make your way out of your mothership. 

 Furthermore, it also offers unparalleled views of the Milky Way. See what makes this planet shine so spectacularly: http://goo.gl/CbJgcW

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SST/WIkipediaCommons

fromquarkstoquasars:

The Best View in the Galaxy

The lovely rendering shown here is meant to be a computer simulation depicting the immediate environment of HD 69830 c; a planet that can be found about 41 light-years from Earth (in the Puppis constellation)

Our exoplanet is far more different than most of the planets we’ve discovered so far, being that the planet doesn’t want you dead before you can even make your way out of your mothership.

Furthermore, it also offers unparalleled views of the Milky Way. See what makes this planet shine so spectacularly: http://goo.gl/CbJgcW

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SST/WIkipediaCommons

science-junkie
libutron:

Brachystelma gerrardii | ©Lourens Grobler   (Near Wakkerstroom, Mpumalanga, South Africa)
Brachystelma gerrardii (Gentianales - Apocynaceae) is a South African plant exceptionally rare, with subpopulations usually consisting of no more than 10 mature individuals. Locally it is considered a threatened species [1].
There are black and blue-green metallic color forms of Brachystelma gerrardii flowers. This black one is common in the more northerly reaches of the distribution area [2].

libutron:

Brachystelma gerrardii | ©Lourens Grobler   (Near Wakkerstroom, Mpumalanga, South Africa)

Brachystelma gerrardii (Gentianales - Apocynaceae) is a South African plant exceptionally rare, with subpopulations usually consisting of no more than 10 mature individuals. Locally it is considered a threatened species [1].

There are black and blue-green metallic color forms of Brachystelma gerrardii flowers. This black one is common in the more northerly reaches of the distribution area [2].